Tour Stop 11 for ‘Kilingiri’ by Tamar Hela

Book Title:  Kilingiri

Author:  Janna Gray

Release Date:  May 21st 2013

Genre:  Romance, Women’s Fiction, Romantic Saga, Saga

Publisher:  GMTA Publishing, LLC

Presented by:  As You Wish Tours

Janna Gray

MY INTERVIEW WITH JANNA GRAY

TH: Tell us a bit about yourself—what’s your background and how did you become a writer?

JG: I was born in Ceylon (Sri Lanka) and educated at convent schools in Kodaikanal, South India and  Derbyshire, UK before training to become a teacher in London. My husband and I lived and worked in Singapore, Hong Kong, and Thailand and are currently in Dubai, UAE. I’ve always loved writing – I had to really, as at boarding school I was expected to write home every week (the letters were edited for whinges about the nuns and the food!) and as I grew older, before the advent of email and Skype, I continued to keep in touch with family and friends via letters. I kept diaries and wrote short stories to entertain my younger sisters so progressing to writing a book seemed like a pretty good idea!

TH: What is the genre in which you write?

JG: I write romantic sagas. Kilingiri covers two continents and thirty years. Taprobane ( finished but not yet published) and The Scarlet Thread (I’ve written three chapters!) are also sagas which start off in Ceylon and Hong Kong …


TH: Have you published or written any other works?

JG: When in I lived in Singapore, Hong Kong, and Thailand, I wrote articles on pretty much anything  for newspapers and magazines. In addition, I was the Year Book editor for NIST, a wonderful IB school in Bangkok, Thailand where I worked for many years.


TH: Name your top three favorite characters you’ve made up and explain why they’re your favorites.

JG: Nina, Cassie and Midge are my favourite characters. When we first meet Nina from ‘Kilingiri’ in the 60s, she is young, pregnant and unmarried and naïve, facing the consequences of some pretty bad errors of judgement. But she has the resilience of youth; she is great company, intelligent and loving and refuses to accept the obstacles that stand in the way of finding and keeping love. When troubles strike she goes under for a while, as we all do, but then she pulls herself up and gets on with life. She is feisty and can be bloody-minded, she is loyal, a devoted single mum and a loving daughter and friend. She learns to accept there are things she cannot change so she works around them. She also understands the healing power of forgiveness and importance of letting go of the negative aspects of life to make room for the positive.

Cassie from ‘Taprobane’ lives an idyllic life in Ceylon but learns that her paradise contains snakes. She rises above the horrendous effect of spousal abuse and just when we think she has found love and happiness it is snatched away from her. Cassie goes on to raise her daughter alone and takes on the responsibility of another child who has been abandoned by her mother. She is a good, strong woman but like so many of us she is not perfect and she too understands the healing power of forgiveness without becoming a doormat. I hope readers will meet Cassie soon.

Midge and I are getting to know each other through the pages of ‘The Scarlet Thread’, but as her character is still developing in my mind, I can’t say too much about her other than she is barely sixteen at the start of the story, has a lousy relationship with her step mother but is loved dearly by the servants at her family’s home in Hong Kong. I like her already. Despite her learning difficulties, she is strong, adventurous, has a sense of humour and rolls with the punches. Without giving too much away, her life and the relationships she forges impact greatly on the lives of others.


TH: What projects are you currently working on?

JG: Taprobane is in the capable hands of four lovely pre-readers and a wonderful friend  with an eagle eye. This has given me time to get on with planning and researching facts for ‘The Scarlet Thread’ which is based in Hong Kong between 1978 and the handover to China in 1997. I’ve knocked out three chapters in Midge’s voice … a new approach for me so I have to focus! I hope it works, as I have become rather fond of her!


TH: What has been the toughest criticism given to you as an author? What has been the best compliment?

JG: I’ve had two potentially soul-destroying criticisms. One I ignored as it was plain nasty … along the lines of ‘This will not do, but don’t throw it on the rubbish heap yet, there are some salvageable sections.’ The other was to go back to the manuscript and cut out all the extraneous crap. I was hugely taken aback as I loved every word I’d written (!) but I did what the tough-as-old-boots editor suggested and the result is Kilingiri as she is today, a much better read! And with the blessed gift of hindsight, the extraneous stuff really was crap!

Choosing the best compliment is not easy as I’ve been lucky to have some fabulous reviews but this one ticks pretty much all the boxes! ‘Janna Gray’s Kilingiri was a phenomenal read that tantalizes you with the scenery but really comes through with the characters and the story. You won’t want to miss this book, but be ready to want to travel to the far corners of the world that Janna describes so eloquently.’

TH: What advice can you give to aspiring authors?

JG: Prepare, research, and write from the heart. You don’t have to restrict your writing to what you know about as I’m sure no author is best buddies with a gang of vampires, but nevertheless inhabit the world you’ve created until it becomes second nature to you and thus a believable realm for your readers.

Edit, edit edit, edit, edit, edit, edit, edit, and edit again!

And don’t give up!


TH: What’s a cool fact about you that you’ll share with us?

JG: I once sailed an Enterprise dinghy up a ramp and in to the bar of a yacht club in Ceylon. My good friend Richard who was with me in the dinghy was horrified. But not as horrified as our fathers who were faced with a rather large bill for the repair of a part of the bar, several bar stools and the dinghy.  Although Richard mentioned that episode and a couple of others at my wedding, we are still great friends!

 

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1968, Srinagar, Kashmir and Nina is devastated by the death of her new-born baby girl. Sister Angela and Father Michael at the mission hospital step in to nurse Nina back to health but when the friendship between Nina and Father Michael turns to love, Michael makes a decision which will resonate through the years.

It is 1981 and in Kinsale, Ireland, Nina, devoted to her son Joshua, lives a loveless existence, but a chance encounter changes everything. Michael is back in her life, he leaves the priesthood and happiness is within their grasp.

But when past and present collide, their whole world is turned upside down.

Only by facing the consequences of what has gone before, can Nina and Michael embrace the future.

Janna Gray guides us masterfully through this poignant story of love, loss, betrayal and hope.

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Posted in Abduction, Best Seller Amazon Kindle, Best Seller Goodreads, Book Fair, Clergy, Contemporary, Event release, Exotic Locations, Friendship, GMTA PUBLISHING, Hong Kong, India, Kashmir, Post Natal Depression, Redemption, Religion, Romance, Saga, Singapore, Single parents, Thailand, Women's Contemporary Fiction | Leave a comment

Tour Stop 10 for ‘Kilingiri’ by Jodie Pierce

 

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Book Title:  Kilingiri
Author:  Janna Gray
Release Date:  May 21st 2013
Publisher:  GMTA Publishing, LLC
Presented by:  As You Wish Tours

 

EXCERPT

Nina was very fond of David Kelly. Over the years he’d escorted her to the theatre and concerts in Cork and Dublin and she often accompanied him to business functions when he needed a partner. Initially his hauteur was disconcerting, but on getting to know him, she discovered his deliciously dry sense of humour and enormous capacity for kindness and generosity. He’d held Nina’s hand when Josh had his tonsils removed and she knew she would always be able to count on his support and affection. And once, after an evening on the beach with a bottle of champagne and a quick snog, David’s attempt to kindle a spark of romance was abandoned with no hard feelings, except one which he joked about.

Only once during the years since Josh’s birth had she felt the need for roses, champagne and glorious sex and when the opportunity arose, she grabbed it greedily. Tony Mayhew roared into her life on a Harley Davidson the week she exhibited some of her paintings at his chic gallery in Cork. He’d rented a cottage outside Kinsale that long ago summer and they’d become inseparable. He made her laugh and delighted her with funny little gifts. She was slightly disappointed when the romance ran its course, but she knew that he didn’t want to settle down, and besides he wouldn’t have been a good father figure for Josh.

Since the fling with Tony there had been no one special in Nina’s life, and when her body yearned for a man’s touch, she came to realise that the solitary act of self-gratification was no substitute for the mouth and arms of the man she loved and missed with such intensity it caused physical pain, and gradually she learned to sublimate the need for physical gratification until it ceased to be of importance. Nowadays she could laugh with Laura and Meg about her abysmal lack of a sex-life on the grounds that the part of her that once needed physical fulfillment had shriveled up like a raisin.

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1968, Srinagar, Kashmir and Nina is devastated by the death of her new-born baby girl.
Sister Angela and Father Michael at the mission hospital step in to nurse Nina back to health but when the friendship between Nina and Father Michael turns to love, Michael makes a decision which will resonate through the years.
It is 1981 and in Kinsale, Ireland, Nina, devoted to her son Joshua, lives a loveless existence, but a chance encounter changes everything. Michael is back in her life, he leaves the priesthood and happiness is within their grasp.
But when past and present collide, their whole world is turned upside down.
Only by facing the consequences of what has gone before, can Nina and Michael embrace the future.
Janna Gray guides us masterfully through this poignant story of love, loss, betrayal and hope.

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AUTHOR LINKS

Facebook Profile https://www.facebook.com/jeannine.gray.315?fref=ts

Goodreads http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/6584787.Janna_Gray

Amazon US http://www.amazon.com/Janna-Gray/e/B009SGLH9A/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1

Amazon UK http://www.amazon.co.uk/Janna-Gray/e/B009SGLH9A/ref=sr_tc_2_0qid=1358404780&sr=1-2-ent

Website https://jannagray.wordpress.com/

Twitter https://twitter.com/JannaGray9

Facebook Email jeannine.gray.315@facebook.com

Blog http://strictlysagas.blogspot.com/

BOOK LINKS

Amazon US http://www.amazon.com/Kilingiri-ebook/dp/B009KHYGLS/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1368218821&sr=8-1&keywords=Kilingiri

Amazon UK http://www.amazon.co.uk/Kilingiri-ebook/dp/B009KHYGLS/ref=la_B009SGLH9A_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1368108901&sr=1-1

Goodreads http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17407165-kilingiri?ac=1

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Kilingiri Tour by Michelle Riccio

Book Title:  Kilingiri

Author:  Janna Gray

Release Date:  May 21st 2013

Genre:  Romance, Women’s Fiction, Romantic Saga, Saga

Publisher:  GMTA Publishing, LLC

Presented by:  As You Wish Tours 

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How to Make Characters Believable

Character creation isn’t just about giving the hero or heroine a name and describing his or her looks – height, weight, skin type, hair colour, striking (or not) features or where they come from, it is about what makes them tick – how they think and feel, what they eat and drink, the clothes they wear, their beliefs, their needs and desires. Characters have to be real, multi-faceted, flesh and blood individuals like the ones we meet in our daily lives, and as with ‘real’ people, the reader will choose to like or dislike them, trust or distrust them.

When writing Kilingiri I wanted the characters to come across as rounded, three dimensional beings with a combination of the faults and foibles of ‘real’ men and women. This wasn’t particularly easy when describing Father Declan and Pip Carlisle. I disliked them intensely and had a hard time coming up with at least one redeeming trait for each of them, particularly Pip who was a bitchy, selfish, vulgar slut! But …she dressed well … as well as women who favoured bling and shoulder pads in the 80s could be considered well-dressed. Father Declan – another horror who stooped to black mail and other skulduggeries – had beautiful white hair which shone like a halo and he was devoted to his Mission. Funnily enough one reader sympathised with him and totally understood why in his zeal to protect the funds for the mission, he resorted to trickery that ruined lives!

Describing the characters’ backgrounds is another way of making them life-like. Relationships with parents and siblings are often a major contributor to the way a person views himself, and the same goes for the interaction with friends. The level of education attained affects the choice of career which in turn impacts on the type of job and the amount of disposable income available for housing, holidays, meals out etc. These aspects influence the way people behave and can often be used to make allowances for a particular idiosyncrasy or attitude.

The type of upbringing matters too … Although he has been taught not to lash out in anger, Josh (in Kilingiri) retaliates when a boy at school calls him a bastard and makes fun of him for not having a father. He understands brawling is unacceptable but it is the only way that his childish persona feels he can protect his mother’s name and keep the bullies off his back. When eventually his father is reunited with his mother, he reacts with anger. He has been the man of the house for all his life and resents the appearance of an adult male who usurps his role. At the age of eighteen, had he accepted his birth father’s unexpected return with enthusiasm, one would wonder as to his credibility as a rounded, multi-dimensional character.

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Kilingiri Blog Tour: Excerpt

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Book Title:  Kilingiri

Author:  Janna Gray

Release Date:  May 21st 2013

Genre:  Romance, Women’s Contemporary Fiction, Romantic Saga, Saga

Publisher:  GMTA Publishing, LLC

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1968, Srinagar, Kashmir and Nina is devastated by the death of her new-born baby girl. Sister Angela and Father Michael at the mission hospital step in to nurse Nina back to health but when the friendship between Nina and Father Michael turns to love, Michael makes a decision which will resonate through the years.

It is 1981 and in Kinsale, Ireland, Nina, devoted to her son Joshua, lives a loveless existence, but a chance encounter changes everything. Michael is back in her life, he leaves the priesthood and happiness is within their grasp.

But when past and present collide, their whole world is turned upside down.

Only by facing the consequences of what has gone before, can Nina and Michael embrace the future.

Janna Gray guides us masterfully through this poignant story of love, loss, betrayal and hope.

 

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EXCERPT

 The women from different cultures and walks of life had come to disregard the barriers of diverse languages and creeds and united in their common cause for survival. Khun Nok, sentenced for life for killing her viciously abusive husband after he’d etched his name in six inch letters on her back, painstakingly removed colonies of head-lice from her companions’ hair. Burly Khun Noi, irrepressibly cheerful, taught everyone how to catch and eat cockroaches – she claimed they tasted like fried chicken – to boost their protein intake. Nina refrained, preferring to risk scabies or beriberi rather than allow a molecule to pass between her lips.

 At dusk, always the worst time for inmates as it heralded the onset of another endless night of stifling humidity and whining, stinging mosquitoes, Samara, a statuesque Nigerian with cheekbones like knife-blades, cajoled everyone to dance while she beat out the rhythm on an up-turned bucket. And there was Susie, an Australian locked up for being caught red-handed carrying hash for a man who’d promised her a ticket home, who often made them weep with laughter when she mimicked the posturings of the guards. Those quicksilver moments, when hope raised its weary head at the prospect of freedom, were all too easily overshadowed when harsh reality kicked in and the desire to curl up small and pray for death became the easier option.

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Author Interview ‘Kilingiri’

INTERVIEW WITH JANNA GRAY

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If you had to describe yourself using three words, they would be?

I’d like to think people find me an approachable, loving and loyal person.

If you could introduce one of your characters to any character from another book, who would it be and why?

I’d like Nina to meet Camilla from the Langani Trilogy by Barbara and Stephanie Keating. They are both expatriates with feisty characters and big hearts, they’ve made some pretty big errors of judgment but learned from their mistakes and they have warm, affectionate natures. I think they’d get on famously.

What are you doing when you’re not writing?

Until 2011 I squeezed my writing time between teaching and running the house. Now that I am a lady of leisure I have the time to meet friends for lunch or attend functions – I still get a massive kick out of being sociable during school hours – and like all women I love to shop but not necessarily buy as I swear clothes’ sizing in Dubai is way off kilter! I go to the gym but not for pleasure. To me there is nothing worse that walking nowhere for miles on a treadmill, getting hot and sweaty but I want to be a fit and fab granny when my sons get round to having children. I love cooking (another reason to go to the gym) reading, listening to music, swimming without getting my hair wet and catching up with friends.

Can you share a favorite quote from KILINGIRI with readers?

I have several but this is my all-time favourite: ‘Nina my sweet, if a mother and father can love more than one child, why do you find it so difficult to accept that a child can love more than one mother and father?’

What inspired you to write this piece?

Kilingiri started with the thought … what must it be like for priests to fall in love and want the whole package – the love and companionship of a wife, passion, sex and family life and children. I then went on to consider the Catholic Church’s reasons for refusing to allow her clergy to experience the blessings which the majority of us want and need in our lives and question whether the church has the right to expect celibacy as nowhere in the bible is it stated that priests should not marry and have families of their own. It seemed like a good premise for a story so I went for it.

If you were deserted on an island and could only have one thing with you, what would it be and why?

Sunblock. Who wants to end up like a wrinkled raisin?

If you could have any superpower in the world what would it be?

Patience! I want everything to happen yesterday!

What time of day are you most creative?
Mornings are good for me. I’m wiped by about 9.30pm and fall asleep in front of the tv!

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Research Before Writing a Novel

Book Title:  Kilingiri
Author:  Janna Gray
Release Date:  May 21st 2013
Genre:  Romance, Women’s Fiction, Romantic Saga, Saga
Presented by:  As You Wish Tours
 
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Research before writing a Novel

I have either lived in or spent a considerable time visiting all Kilingiri’s exotic locations so I was fortunate to have my memory, photograph albums and diaries to turn to when writing the book. But having said that, memory can be fickle and clouded by personal experiences and opinions so I had to do a considerable amount of research via books and the net or by talking to people to ensure I’d got my facts right.
 
There is nothing more annoying than reading a book which contains inaccurate information about locations, eras or historical events. To create a comprehensive background to a novel, to make it ‘real’, the writer must include details that make up the characters’ lives – what they wore, what they ate, their speech patterns, what influenced their thoughts, the music they listened to, their beliefs and customs. In addition, the use of foreign words within the novel has to be correct too because the chances are that at least one of your readers knows or happens to know someone who speaks the language you’ve mentioned!
 
At the start of Kilingiri, Nina is pregnant and unmarried and has been sent away to live in Kashmir until her father, a diplomat, can cobble together a story that will account for the presence of a grandchild without a father. This information conveys to the reader that the novel is set in an era when illegitimacy wasn’t the norm or certainly not accepted in a particular stratum of society, or it could be the story of a woman from a much stricter culture in the 1990s or the 21st century. Then descriptions of Nina’s clothes, the way she speaks, the music she listens to and actual ‘real time’ events combine to offer the reader a wealth of clues as to the timeframe in which the story takes place.
The characters’ reactions to particular events and experiences have to be realistic too. Very few people spring back from traumatic incidents in five minutes, but equally people react differently to harrowing experiences, some taking the blows in their stride, others going to pieces. In Kilingiri Nina’s reaction to the death of her child is perhaps not how most people would respond but knowing her backstory enables the reader to understand and perhaps even sympathise, and Josh would have been considered decidedly odd had he not got drunk, tried it on with girls and played heavy metal music loud during his teenage years. Without this input, Nina and Josh would be stereotypes, devoid of individuality and quite frankly boring!
 
However, although research is essential for novels that are rooted in planet earth time, it is important not to get bogged down in massive amounts of technical detail at the expense of the writer’s personal observations about the characters’ personas. Research when done properly adds depth and detail to a story but the  ‘voice’ – the combination of the writer’s use of punctuation, syntax, dialogue and so forth gives the written piece its style and flair and its unique quality.  My sons refused to read the love scenes in Kilingiri – they claim they can hear me speaking the words and, poor souls, actually doing what I’m describing, and that in their opinions is way too much information!
 
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Tour Stop: ‘Kilingiri’ by As You Wish Tours

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Kilingiri by Janna GrayBook Title: Kilingiri Author: Janna Gray Release Date: May 21st 2013 Genre: Romance, Women’s Fiction, Romantic Saga, Saga Publisher: GMTA Publishing, LLC Presented by: As You Wish Tours

 

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What Inspired Me to Write Kilingiri

The idea for Kilingiri sprang from a load of day-dreams while I was hanging around waiting for our household goods to be packed up in Singapore and unpacked in Thailand. I have no idea why I happened to remember the priests who hosted the retreats at my convent boarding school in Kodaikanal, South India or the time a couple of handsome American Jesuits pitched up to teach us the value of prayer and the virtues of decorous behaviour around boys.

My friends and I wandered what gave the priests the right to pontificate when we’d be told that they were immune to the temptations of the flesh, so we chose to ignore their suggestions, some of which included gems like ‘Remember you can get pregnant on a glass of sherry.’ Rumour had it that during one of these retreats, a girl flirted with Father Wotsits until – shock horror – he succumbed to her wiles and kissed her. The next thing we knew, she’d been sent home in disgrace and he was later spotted doing swallows and pikes off the diving board at the Madras club, surrounded by a gaggle of admiring women.

So Kilingiri started with the thought … what must it be like for priests to be faced with the temptation of sex. I then went on to consider the Catholic Church’s reasons for refusing to allow her clergy to experience what the majority of us want and need in our lives … romance, passion, love, a family, relationships and children. Was the church right to expect this of her disciples as nowhere is it stated in the bible that priests should not marry and have families of their own.

I chose to  base sections of the story in India where I was educated, Kashmir, a fabulous holiday location, and Singapore, Hong Kong and Thailand where my husband and I spent the best part of twenty-two years. I have visited Ireland and recall the nuns at school and friends at college speaking often and very affectionately about the country, so it seemed right that my heroine Nina elected to return to the family home when she was in need of the comfort of familiar territory. At the time the Catholic Church’s influence in Ireland was strong and birth control and illegitimacy was a massive no-no, but this worked in favour of the plot, adding drama. I am not anti- Catholic … I was born and raised one, met some exceptionally wonderful nuns and priests (Father Keenan is an amalgamation of the best of them) but over the years I found my ‘own way’ as it were … as did Nina.

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1968, Srinagar, Kashmir and Nina is devastated by the death of her new-born baby girl.Sister Angela and Father Michael at the mission hospital step in to nurse Nina back to health but when the friendship between Nina and Father Michael turns to love, Michael makes a decision which will resonate through the years.

It is 1981 and in Kinsale, Ireland, Nina, devoted to her son Joshua, lives a loveless existence, but a chance encounter changes everything. Michael is back in her life, he leaves the priesthood and happiness is within their grasp. But when past and present collide, their whole world is turned upside down.

Only by facing the consequences of what has gone before, can Nina and Michael embrace the future.

Janna Gray guides us masterfully through this poignant story of love, loss, betrayal and hope.

AUTHOR LINKS Facebook Profile Facebook Email Goodreads Amazon US Amazon UK Website Twitter Blog BOOK LINKS Amazon US Amazon UK Goodreads Tour Schedule Sat, June 22 What Inspired Me to Write Kilingiri Julia Hendrix As You Wish Reviews – See more at: http://asyouwishreviews.blogspot.ae/2013/06/tour-stop-kilingiri-by-janna-gray.html#sthash.ZRZ6BAEp.dpuf

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